Home:ALL Converter>Which program to solve integration = 0 for a variable?

Which program to solve integration = 0 for a variable?

Ask Time:2012-09-22T21:12:44         Author:Patrick Seastar

Json Formatter

Closed. This question is off-topic. It is not currently accepting answers.

Author:Patrick Seastar,eproduced under the CC 4.0 BY-SA copyright license with a link to the original source and this disclaimer.
Link to original article:https://stackoverflow.com/questions/12544077/which-program-to-solve-integration-0-for-a-variable
ev-br :

These integrals can be trivially expressed in terms of an error function: Wiki, Mathworld. Hence what you need here is a library to (i) calculate error functions, (ii) numerically solve non-linear equations. Virtually any language has this, so pick anything you're familiar with. In Mathematica, look up Erf and NSolve.",
2012-09-22T13:56:30
duffymo :

I'd start by plugging it into Wolfram Alpha and see what it gives you.\n\nMathematica should be able to do it. I think of statistics first when R comes up; I don't know about its calculus capabilities. Excel is not the first choice.\n\nIf I were you, I'd be less worried about the software and more worried about the solution itself. A function of this form might be well known. Plot each one and visually check to see what the functions look like and how easy they might be to integrate.\n\nLike this: \n\nhttp://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=graph+exp%28-%28%28x%2B5%29%2F1.5%29%5E2%29\n\nYou should be wondering why it's three similar looking integrals. Those singularities in the plot tell you why.\n\nIf there's no closed form solutions, you'll have to go with a numerical one. You'll have to choose an algorithm (simple Euler or Runga Kutta or something else), interval sizes, etc. You'll want to know about singular points and how best to tackle them.\n\nChoosing a package is just the start.",
2012-09-22T13:18:19
yy